November 28, 1978: “The Wild Geese” published

The ULTIMATE NOVEL OF HIGH ADVENTURE…

50 HELL-RAISING MERCENARIES ON A DO-OR-DIE MISSION DEEP IN AFRICA.

The Wild Geese (1978) by Daniel Carney

The Wild Geese is a novel by Rhodesian author Daniel Carney, originally titled The Thin White Line, but it went unpublished until its film adaptation The Wild Geese was made.

May 1968: The CIA hijack a plane as part of a Cold War deal with Congo president General Ndofa, kidnapping deposed Congolese President Julius Limbani who is on a flight to Israel. Waiting for Limbani is an Anglo-South African mercenary soldier Colonel Allen Faulkner. Faulkner is under contract to take Limbani back to the Congo and mount a coup d’état. When Limbani fails to arrive, Faulkner returns to South Africa.

November 1970: Faulkner is summoned to London by merchant banker Sir Edward Matherson and learns that not only is Limbani alive but he is held in Algeria and is to be returned to the Congo for execution. Matherson proposes for Faulkner to raise and lead a mercenary unit to rescue Limbani and bring him to London. Faulkner agrees and sets about assembling his team.

The assembled group of 50 travels to Portuguese-ruled Mozambique for training and are eventually taken to their drop zone in the hills surrounding Albertville, in Congo. The mercenaries free Limbani and, while trying to escape to a waiting plane, are attacked. The plane does not wait and leaves the mercenaries stranded, leaving them to travel to Limbani’s village on foot. After delivering Limbani, the remaining men escape to Rhodesia in a plane from a deserted airstrip.

The Wild Geese was published by Bantam Books on November 28, 1978.

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